Human Rights

As we continue to tackle social justice issues in the United States as well as climate change issues here and around the world, we should also address abuses by multinational corporations, oftentimes indirectly, when such companies rely on suppliers down the supply chain that despoil the land, pollute the water, enslave their labor, and put in jeopardy those who are impacted by such abuses.

Human Rights

As we continue to tackle social justice issues in the United States as well as climate change issues here and around the world, we can also address abuses by multinational corporations, oftentimes indirectly, when such companies rely on suppliers down the supply chain that despoil the land, pollute the water, enslave their labor, and put in jeopardy those who are impacted by such abuses. 

From a human rights perspective, great strides have been made bringing multinational corporations into the fold in holding themselves accountable on issues of human rights. Human rights abuses are less likely to be addressed or even discovered as one goes down the supply chain of these same multinational company products.

We should continue to hold multinational companies accountable through human rights audits, public exposure of human rights violations, and United Nations monitoring.   We should now improve upon our efforts to address environmental, workplace, health, and financial abuses from supply chain enterprises that are too distant, remote, or under the radar.

I propose that the federal government provide standards for procurement that includes impacts by companies throughout the world that provide supplies for products produced, marketed, or sold by large national and multinational companies in the United States. I would also consider expanding criteria to national and municipal environmental review so that light can be shed on where supplies come from so that correlating human rights abuses can be addressed.